Episode 35: Maastricht FAQs with Joes Minis (Part Two)

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This week we’re back with part two of our Maastricht FAQs with special guest Joes Minis. This time we cover the Helpoort, that crumbling medieval wall, university buildings and more! If you haven’t seen part one yet, check it out here!


Above left is a photograph of the Maastricht Treaty being signed in 1992 in the States Hall of the Limburg Provincial House ( (c) creativeeuropedesk.nl). Above right is an Irish poster against the Maastricht Treaty, photographed in Dublin 1992 ( (c) Soleincitta via Wikimedia Commons).

The first photograph above (top left) shows Maastricht’s Friday markets on the Markt ( (c) holland.com). Top right is a photograph of the Vrijthof filled at one of Andre Rieu’s popular concerts ( (c) andrerieu.com). The third photograph here shows the bakery window of the Bisschopsmolen in Maastricht, displaying various pastries, breads and the local delicacy vlaai ( (c) trekearth.com).

Above are images of the Helpoort, a medieval gate which still stands in Maastricht. The first image (top left) shows an illustration of the Helpoort by Jules Lefebvre in 1840 ( (c) RHCL). The second image (top centre) is a photograph showing Fr. Wijssen as a minstrel singing the praise of Maastricht during the conference of the “Association of Dutch Municipalities” in 1953 ( (c) RHCL).

The third image above (top right) shows the Helpoort from the city side (north) in 1868 ( (c) RHCL). The final image (bottom) shows the interior of the Helpoort which is currently a museum ( (c) tripadvisor.com).

The first image above (top left) shows the interior of the fallen medieval wall in Maastricht in 2020 ( (c) Harry Heuts Photography via limburger.nl). The second image (top right) shows the exterior during the cleanup in 2020 ( (c) De Limburger via limburger.nl). The third image (bottom) is a wider shot of the wall closer to it’s initial collapse on the 23/03/2019 ( (c) mestreechtersteerke.nl).

The first image above (top left) shows the siege and capture of Maastricht by the French armies on 30 June 1673, including generals conferring with engineers with a map ( (c) europeana.eu). The second image (top right) shows life in Maastricht in 1670 with the Vrijthof from the northwest including part of the Sint Servaasgasthuis, Sint Jacobskerk and Spanish Government building ( (c) Valentine Klotz via RHCL).

The third image is a painting showing a view of Maastricht showing the attacks of the army of Louis XV of France on the city in 1748 during the War of the Austrian Succession ( (c) Wikimedia Commons).

The first photograph above (left) shows the Roman ruins in the Derlon hotel in Maastricht ( (c) René Voorburg via vici.org). You can visit the hotel website here!

The second photograph (centre) shows the Vrijthof with the Sint Servaaskerk in the centre in c. 1930 – 1941 ( (c) RHCL). The third image (right) shows the Basilica of Our Lady (Basiliek van Onze-Lieve-Vrouw) in Maastricht, 2016 ( (c) Kleon3 via Wikimedia Commons).

The first image above (top left) shows Grote Looiersstraat 17 in 1912, which is now part of Maastricht University ( (c) RHCL). The second image (top right) shows Bonnefantenstraat 2-4 which was previously a monastery and is now the Student Services Centre of the University ( (c) talkbusiness.nl).

The third image (bottom left) shows Minderbroedersberg 4-6 which was previously the Franciscan monastery ‘Tweede Minderbroedersklooster’ (which we covered in episode 11 of our podcast), and now houses the main offices and Executive Board of the University ( (c) fs.maastrichtuniversity.nl). The fourth image (bottom right) shows Tongersestraat 53, a former Jesuit ministry which is now the School of Business and Economics ( (c) fs.maastrichtuniversity.nl/).

The first image above (top left) shows a coloured lithograph of Wyck with Sint Maartenspoort, Sint Martinuskerk, powder tower and Maas bridge Alexander Schaepkens in 1840 ( (c) RHCL). The second image (top right) shows a photograph of the Sint Servaas Bridge with the US Army transporting parts of a Bailey bridge, which was destroyed by the retreating Germans (1946 (c) RHCL).

The third image (bottom left) shows performers holding versions of the Maastricht flag at an Andre Rieu concert in Maastricht ( (c) andrerieu-movies.com). The fourth image (bottom right) shows Fort Sint Pieter flying the Maastricht flag on a sunny day in 2018 ( (c) adailylee.com).


As always, if you have something you have always wanted to know about Maastricht or wanted to ask a local, please contact us through social media or our website and we will do our best to answer your questions in future episodes!